Breaking Down 007: Quantum of Solace’s Negotiation and Communication Scenes

00:07:45

M and Bond speaking

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Very);
  • Description:
    • So, we see a small identity contradiction here. When M mentions Vesper’s boyfriend and the lock of hair, Bond says, “I didn’t think she was the sentimental type”, which is a contradiction with what he knows of her, and M says, “We don’t really know anyone”, contradicting the contradiction (or, in other words, saying what Vesper did was normal);
  • Techniques Present:
    • Identity contradictions (Bond saying Vesper’s behavior does not match what he knows of her);

00:15:40

Bond meeting M at the apartment

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Very);
  • Description:
    • So, we see here an identity contradiction again, and escalation of commitment too. That is, M says that, since Craig Mitchell worked for her for 8 years, passed lie detectors every single year, and was her personal bodyguard for 5, that it’s impossible to believe that he was a traitor. That is, considering everything he’s done, and what she knows about him, she can’t process this action;
    • I consider this highly realistic, because, especially in terms of spycraft and the military, a lot of people will take actions to prove themselves to a side, which makes the person precisely think, “Oh, they can’t be my enemy if they’ve done so much for me, right?”. And that is precisely what allows them to then betray them without even being suspected. It’s using escalation of commitment to trick the other side;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Identity contradiction + escalation of commitment (M can’t believe Mitchell was a traitor due to all the actions he already took, and everything she know of him over time);

00:23:25

Camille talking to Greene

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Reasonably);
  • Description:
    • So, we see Greene here making a joke, when he says, “I shouldn’t have slept with you, I’m starting to like you”, but this is actually a solid principle. You rationalise being with someone, and create feelings due to it. Escalation of commitment. Despite him using it as a joke here, it’s a solid principle;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Escalation of commitment (Sleeping with someone leading to “catching feelings”, and more investment in the person);

00:26:30

Greene convincing general Medrano

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Very);
  • Description:
    • So, a great example of favor dynamics here, plus potential. First, Greene states what he can do for Medrano – getting back the country in two weeks. Then, he asks for a favor in return, and it’s land that seems worthless, so even better. And finally, he offers Camille as a type of trafficked human to the general. He immediately does a favor, asks for one, and gives something additional with effort. Taking aside the terrorist/murder/human trafficking component, very solid reciprocity technique;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Reciprocity + favor dynamics (Greene doing Medrano a favor in return for another);
    • Giving with effort (Greene giving Medrano Camille, additionally);

00:34:40

M speaking with the CIA

  • Is It Realistic: Hmmmm;
  • Description:
    • I like how perceptive M is here, although I don’t know if this is realistic. So, she says that he is of interest because they transferred her to the specific South America agent. I get her point, but it’s also possible they knew the name, investigated him, and concluded he is not of interest. So I wouldn’t take this as confirmation;
  • Techniques Present:
    • None;

00:36:15

Greene negotiating with the CIA

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Very);
  • Description:
    • So, Greene is brokering a deal here between the local government and the US. Basic reciprocity. We also see unexpected rigidity by Beam here, saying they have to verify the find. Greene tries to get out of it in a very polite and subtle way, saying “I’m not even sure there is a find”;
    • We also see Greene using progress and loss here very well. He says that South American countries are already falling like dominoes, and that they don’t want the coup to be stopped and another hostile government. Great example of illustrating the progress, but also what they may lose;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Reciprocity (Greene exchanging the coup for oil licenses);
    • Progress and loss (Greene illustrating what has already been done, but also what they may lose);

00:45:15

Bond threatening the bodyguard

  • Is It Realistic: Hmmmmm;
  • Description:
    • So, not a very good example here. Bond is trying to get information, but he doesn’t mind killing the guy instead. I don’t know how useful or realistic it is. Oh well;
    • We can also see transparency in M when she calls Bond. He literally says, “I feel stress in your voice”, which is an sign that he screwed up, which ends up being correct;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Transparency + grace under fire (M being transparent about being stressed, and being affected by Bond’s actions on the phone);

00:48:30

Bond coming to Mathis

  • Is It Realistic: Hmmm;
  • Description:
    • I don’t know how realistic this is. I mean, Bond is asking Mathis for information, for credit cards, and also to come with him. What does Mathis have to gain with this? This seems very “Hollywood persuasion”. He should have asked for something in return. Or maybe he’s trying to prove he’s innocent since the events of Casino Royale;
    • Later in the train, Bond asks him why he’s there. And he simply says it takes a lot to admit they were wrong. In short, he’s doing this because Bond apologised after accusing him of betrayal? I could see that happening. But still, I wouldn’t travel halfway around the world just due to that. Oh well;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Testing + accelerating to a justification (When Bond asks Mathis to justify why he’s there with him);

00:58:10

Camille and Greene

  • Is It Realistic: Hmmmm;
  • Description:
    • So, first, when Camille starts undermining Greene’s conversation, it’s accelerating to the ridiculous. See how, instead of fighting his facts, she jumps on top of that, and she reveals all the dirty stuff he did. “Oh, tell them also about the logging rights, that cut down the forests, after the government sold us the land. Am I wrong?”. So, she’s taking what he already said, and then adding dirty details to undermine it and make it ridiculous;
    • Then, we have basic threats and reciprocity. Camille demands Medrano in return for not ruining the conversation with more investors;
    • Then, we have a bit of exclusion here with Bond. Greene tries to assert dominance by talking about having sex with Camille, to exclude Bond and try to put him in a lower category. You can see it’s try hard, but the goal is to exclude Bond, making him seem of lower status;
    • I don’t know how realistic this is. Camille has no bargaining power whatsoever, but keeps trying to make a deal with Greene. But he’s transactional and doesn’t care, so maybe it’s OK. Or maybe they’re just dumb characters – that would actually be very realistic. It’s OK in terms of realism, I guess;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Accelerating to a contradiction (Camille taking Greene’s conversation and filling it with additional, negative details to make it unsavory);
    • Pressure/threats + reciprocity (Camille demanding the general in return for not screwing Greene out of more investments);
    • Exclusion (Greene talking about being with Camille to exclude Bond and make him seem of lower status);

01:02:40

Mathis’s last words

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Somewhat);
  • Description:
    • So, we see permission manipulation here. That is, Bond has not been able to forgive Vesper for her betrayal, despite the fact she saved his life. So Mathis, with his last words, is getting Bond to give himself permission to forgive, and to move on with his life;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Permission manipulation (Getting Bond to forgive Vesper and move on);

01:11:20

M and the Minister speaking

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Very);
  • Description:
    • We see a good example of spinning here. While M is framing this as taking out a villain, the minister is framing this as being out of necessity;
    • We also see the minister using implementation intention against her, himself. He says, “Let’s say he is a villain, how would we do this?”, and insists there is no way to capture him or his organisation. Great example of using implementation to show that, in this case, they cannot implement it;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Spinning/reframing (Both of them seeing the situation from different points of view);
    • Implementation intention (The minister showing there is no way to capture Greene, showing there is no “how” to doing it);

01:17:55

M and Bond in his room

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Somewhat);
  • Description:
    • So, we see spinning and reframing. And we see Bond even lashing out. Bond is spinning his actions as doing his duty, while M is framing them as him being on the warpath due to Vesper. I agree with her. But we can see both sides here. We also see paradox intention, because, since Bond doesn’t want to admit his weakness and mistakes, he’s actually attacking M as a defensive maneuver, (“How much oil are the Americans paying you?”);
  • Techniques Present:
    • Spinning/reframing (Bond and M framing his actions from two different points of view);
    • Paradox intention (Bond attacking M to prevent her from attacking him);

01:22:15

Bond meeting Felix

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Reasonably);
  • Description:
    • So, usual spinning here. Bond says he’s impressed with the way they carved the country, and Felix takes that as a compliment;
    • Also, we see a bit of removing exits here. Bond asking him if he’s sure about what he is doing here;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Spinning (Bond and Felix having two different points of view on the domination of the country);
    • Removing exits (Bond asking Felix if he’s sure about what he is doing);

01:26:55

Greene meeting with Medrano and the military

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Somewhat);
  • Description:
    • We see basic reciprocity. Green will give him the money when he signs the deal. But then Greene pulls unexpected rigidity. That is, renegotiating the water supply contract in real-time, and forcing him to accept it;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Reciprocity (Basic exchange of favors);
    • Unexpected rigidity (Greene demanding the water supply contract be signed);

01:36:40

Bond and Camille in the car

  • Is It Realistic: Yes (Very);
  • Description:
    • So, we see a nice exchange of permission manipulation for both sides. Camille is wondering if she will give herself permission to rest, now that Medrano is dead, and she tells Bond that, in his case, he hasn’t give himself permission yet, and he’s the only one who can, so she can’t do anything for him;
  • Techniques Present:
    • Permission manipulation (Camille giving herself permission to move on, but Bond hasn’t yet);

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